Stenting the Brachial Artery

Figure 1. Angiography with contrast of right brachial artery.

Figure 1. Angiography with contrast of right brachial artery.

The April issue of Vascular Disease Management features a case report describing a 79-year-old female patient with a history of coronary artery disease and hypertension who 10 months prior had 2-vessel coronary artery bypass surgery. She presented with pain, numbness, and weakness in her right hand that had been increasing in severity for several months. She underwent angiography via a right femoral artery approach, which revealed a severe stenosis of the proximal right brachial artery with what appeared to be a dissection plane extending to above the elbow.

The patient was ultimately treated with a Quick-Cross 0.035″ x 135 cm support catheter (Spectranectics) to enable placement of a 0.035″ x 260 cm Rosen wire (Cook Medical) into the radial artery.

Read “Stenting for Brachial Artery Dissection and Stenosis” by Bradley D. Stauber, DO, Arvin Arthur, MD, and Scott Baron, MD, for more on the treatment and the resolution of this case.

 

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