Does Subclavian Steal Require Intervention?

From "Subclavian Stent Recoil: Endovascular Management Using a Manually Crimped High Radial Strength Bare Metal Stent," VASCULAR DISEASE MANAGEMENT 2013:10(2):E23-E25.

From “Subclavian Stent Recoil: Endovascular Management Using a Manually Crimped High Radial Strength Bare Metal Stent,” VASCULAR DISEASE MANAGEMENT 2013:10(2):E23-E25.

In the clinical blog on Vascular Disease Management this month,  editor in chief Frank Criado, MD, FACS, FSVM, addresses the topic of subclavian steal, which was also discussed in the February 2013 Case Files by Dr. George column, “Subclavian Stent Recoil: Endovascular Management Using a Manually Crimped High Radial Strength Bare Metal Stent” (see image for Figure 1 from this article). Dr. Criado reminds readers that subclavian steal syndrome is a subclavian artery stenosis located proximal to the origin of the vertebral artery, and that the syndrome differs from the garden-variety subclavian steal.

“Many would appear to believe such steal phenomenon can lead to stroke and that revascularization can prevent it. The well-documented reality of this situation is altogether different: most patients with the above-described set of findings have what we can appropriately term subclavian steal phenomenon or, simply, subclavian steal. But not the syndrome!” writes Dr. Criado.

For more discussion, read “Subclavian Steal: A Benign Clinical Finding That Requires No Intervention.”

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